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Online Development Opportunities

The Center for Teaching and Learning sponsors workshops and other events to provide Boise State instructors with opportunities to reinforce best-practices in teaching, learn from colleagues, and reflect upon the choices we make as teachers. Online workshops allow the Center for Teaching and Learning to meet the diverse needs of faculty, including distance faculty and adjunct faculty.

“I really found this short but very focused instruction useful–something I could learn from but complete in a short amount of time. The feedback was very useful.”

SPRING 2018 ONLINE OFFERINGS

Identifying and Preventing Plagiarism (Self-Directed, Facilitated Version)

  • Available from 01/28/20187 through 02/11/2018.
  • Facilitated by Kevin Wilson, IDEA Shop, and Teresa Focarile, Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Register for Identifying and Preventing Plagiarism (Self-Directed Version)
  • This online workshop identifies some of the reasons why students plagiarize or otherwise engage in academic dishonesty, provides examples of technologies that either enable plagiarism or help to prevent it, illustrates strategies and techniques for identifying plagiarism, and provides strategies for creating “plagiarism-proof” assignments and assessments. In addition, the workshop offers an overview of Boise State policies and procedures associated with academic integrity. This is a self-directed, facilitated workshop, which means that you can proceed through it at your own pace with the assistance of facilitators from the IDEA Shop and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Open Educational Resources: All Access — Locate, Create, and Use OER

  • Conducted asynchronously online, available from 01/29/2018 through 04/01/2018.
  • Requires up to 5 hours to complete, but can be completed in stages.
  • Facilitated by Bob Casper, IDEA Shop, and OER Faculty Mentors
  • Register for Open Educational Resources.
  • The use of Open Educational Resources (OER) is a great way to reduce textbook costs for students and to increase flexibility in the texts used in a course. This is an online, open-access, self-paced workshop, built to demonstrate how to find, adapt, and develop OER in a step-by-step manner. OER elements are openly licensed for reuse, usually through a Creative Commons license, which allows them to be integrated into most instruction. The course is organized into five areas, each of which represents one facet of the world of OER. Participants are encouraged to complete all areas of the workshop by following the suggested course progression, but each area can also be completed individually. This workshop will be offered from late January to early April, so as to allow a community around this workshop’s OER concepts to develop.

Introduction to Universal Design and Accessibility

  • Conducted asynchronously online, available from 02/04/2018 through 03/18/2018
  • Counts toward the BUILD Certificate Program.
  • Facilitated by Erik Hadley, History and Bob Casper, IDEA Shop
  • Register for Universal Design and Accessibility for Online Courses.
  • Available to participants during a 6-week period, this facilitated, self-paced online workshop is an introduction to designing courses that are usable and accessible for all users, regardless of their differing capabilities. In addition to familiarizing participants with the fundamental issues and ideas of universal design and accessibility, the workshop is intended to inspire further exploration of and advocacy for designing materials that benefit all students and help them achieve their educational goals. Although the focus of the workshop is on online learning, much of the material is applicable to face-to-face teaching and to any learning environment that uses digital materials. Workshop content is organized into three modules:
    • Universal Design
    • Accessibility
    • Assistive Technology

The Universally Designed Rubric: Grading Student Work Submitted in Multiple Formats

  • Conducted asynchronously online, available from 03/11/2018 through 03/18/2018
  • Requires approximately two hours to complete.
  • Counts toward the BUILD Certificate Program.
  • Facilitated by Kevin Wilson, IDEA Shop, and Eric Hadley, History.
  • Register for The Universally Designed Rubric.
  • Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for the design of materials and instructional methods that are usable by a wide range of students. UDL recognizes that learners differ in the ways in which they navigate a learning environment and express what they know, and that learning systems should accommodate variability among learners from the outset. From these premises is drawn a central principle of UDL: provide students with multiple means of action and expression. One way to do so is to allow students to submit an assignment in one of several media. This facilitated, asynchronous online workshop focuses on a major research assignment in History 100: Themes in World History, one that asks students to document their research in either a 4- to 5-page paper, a food blog, or an 8-minute video. The workshop also explores the logistics of assessing a single assignment submitted in multiple media, with particular attention paid to the use of assessment rubrics.

How Accessible Is Your Syllabus?

  • Conducted asynchronously online, available from 04/01/2018 through 04/08/2018
  • Requires approximately two hours to complete.
  • Counts toward the BUILD Certificate Program.
  • Facilitated by Kevin Wilson, IDEA Shop, and Teresa Focarile, Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Register for How Accessible Is Your Syllabus?
  • How accessible is your syllabus? That is, to what extent is it able to be used by all intended users, each with differing capabilities?  The goal of this workshop is to enable faculty to assess the extent to which their syllabus is accessible and to acquaint them with some relevant principles of accessibility. This facilitated, asynchronous online workshop (equivalent to a 2-hour face-to-face workshop) provides you with an opportunity to assess the extent to which your syllabus is accessible and to identify aspects of the syllabus that can be made more accessible. The workshop uses a checklist drawn from principles defined at accessiblesyllabus.tulane.edu and in other resources. The workshop also provides practice in using Microsoft Word’s accessibility checker. Finally, the workshop includes a brief online discussion.